Grafting and Marcotting

Many of our plants are grafted including our avocados, loquats, citrus, mangos, persimmons and more.

The concept of grafting has been around for more than a thousand years. The process generally involves taking budwood (a short piece of a young branch which is also known as a scion) of a highly successful, established ‘mother’ tree or plant and joining it to a selected rootstock. This means the new plant will have the same or very similar fruiting qualities to the original mother plant.

Our citrus trees are budded - which is a form of grafting - where the scion is a bud from a selected 'mother' tree. The rootstock for grafted plants is often chosen for its vigour and robustness, so offers an additional growing advantage. 

Grafted plants have many advantages over trees grown from seed, including:

  • Faster fruiting than a tree grown only from seed
  • Higher yield
  • Better quality
  • More consistency

Our lychees are marcotted trees. Marcotting - also known as air layering - is a process whereby a piece of a very successful ‘mother’ plant is encouraged to grow roots from one of its branches. The trees selected to marcott are those that are already mature and have demonstrated excellent fruit bearing qualities. Marcotting does not harm the plant.

Marcotted plants have advantages over trees grown from seed, including:

  • Faster fruiting than a tree grown only from seed
  • Higher yield
  • Better quality
  • More consistency